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1998 auto trans fluid change

  #1  
Old 10-18-2018, 09:39 AM
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Default 1998 auto trans fluid change

1998 Accord LX 4 cyl - Auto trans.

A reman transmission was put in about 3-4 years ago. And it's been about 40,000 miles. The fluid is somewhat pink. but a little darker.

I'd like to change the transmission fluid and was shocked to see what the steps were...
Is it really that simple - -Remove drain plug, plug back in, then add 2.6 quarts?

If so I have a few questions.

1) Chilton and Hayes manual says to add 2.6 quarts. Is that everything or am I only draining 1/2 the fluid?

2) Manual says to use Honda Approved ATF trans fluid. I have no idea what the shop put in when they changed the transmission.
At O'Riellys, I see Valvoline ATF+4 synthetic. If the shop put in conventional fluid and I put in synthetic, will that hurt anything?
Or is there a recommended brand I should use?

3) One of the manuals says to replace washer before putting drain plug back in. I thought when I looked a few years ago, the plug was a square for the socket to fit in and didn't see a washer (like I do on the oil drain plug).
Do I really need to replace the washer?

4) Is there anything else I need to know?
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 09:59 AM
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A few comments in no particular order:
  • A standard fluid replacement (i.e. drain/refill) typically does between 2.5 and 3.0 quarts.
  • To do an almost complete replacement of the ATF you should do the above procedure three times (often called a 3x3) with a small amount of driving between changes.
  • Do not use ATF+4, that is an ATF exclusively for Chrysler transmissions.
  • The correct ATF for your car is Honda DW-1; you can buy it from Amazon and many other online vendors.
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 10:35 AM
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Ok, thanks for the replies...

So there is no Honda compatible transmission fluid at O'riellys, AutoZone, or Pep Boys?
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 10:55 AM
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There's a few things to influence just how much drains out, so after you're done you should check the level on the dipstick. Don't just close your eyes & add 2.5 quarts.
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 11:00 AM
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Everyone probably has a little different amount they get out keep in mind if your car's sitting flat, on ramps, etc. One simple step I have done is measure what drains in a pyrex measuring cup or anything you have to use then just put back the exact amount of used you took out. Of course still drive and check the level but at least your not just guessing. Kind of a bitch to accidentally put in to much. I've never changed it the "3x3" method but I've been doing it annually since around 60,000 miles so I think I'm good.
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 11:23 AM
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Still - I am more concerned about which type of ATF to put in.

If I get Valvoline conventional AT Fluid and the back says " Honda Compatible" that if good enough? Do I need to worry about whether it's synthethic or not?
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 12:43 PM
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Originally Posted by rockhoundrob View Post
Still - I am more concerned about which type of ATF to put in.

If I get Valvoline conventional AT Fluid and the back says " Honda Compatible" that if good enough? Do I need to worry about whether it's synthethic or not?
Honda developed their transmissions to operate with a very specific ATF with a very specific Coefficient of Friction (CoF); the Valvoline ATF is a multi-vehicle formula which may be relatively close to the Honda specs, however it is highly unlikely it matches. The thing about CoF is, if the ATF is too slippery, the clutches will take too long to engage and cause excess wear, if the CoF is not slippery enough, the clutches engage too rapidly and transmit shock through the transmission which can weaken internal components. Either way, transmission life is going to be less than if you used an ATF with the correct CoF. As for what is available at your local auto parts store, I have never once seen a certified Honda DW-1 compliant ATF in any store; said another way, if the brand isn't Honda and if the type isn't DW-1, do not use it in your transmission.

Regarding the base oil for the ATF; most (probably all) contemporary OEM ATF specifications are synthetic; that is the least of your concerns.
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 01:21 PM
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OK, so I guess I will just need to go to the Honda Dealer and buy 3 quarts, then I can sleep at night?
 
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Old 10-18-2018, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by rockhoundrob View Post
OK, so I guess I will just need to go to the Honda Dealer and buy 3 quarts, then I can sleep at night?
Like I wrote above, you can buy it from Amazon or any number of other online retailers.
 
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Old 10-19-2018, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by rockhoundrob View Post
OK, so I guess I will just need to go to the Honda Dealer and buy 3 quarts, then I can sleep at night?
If you're going to do the 3 x 3 change (mentioned above), you'll need 9 quarts total.
Also see my sig line.
 

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